Blog

HawesM3

Transporting Lithium Batteries

08/08/2013

In the 41st session of the UN Sub-Committee of Experts for the Transport of Dangerous Goods a new special provision (SP376) was adopted. This new special provision is included in the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods: Model Regulations (18th Revised Edition), released mid-2013. SP376 applies to lithium metal cells or batteries (UN3090-UN3091) and lithium ion cells or batteries (UN3480-UN3481) which are defective or damaged and therefore unable to conform to SP230, which states the obligation to meet the requirements of the tests listed in the Manual of Tests and Criteria.

Specifically SP376 includes cell and batteries which:

  • Are identified as being defective for safety reasons
  • Are defective but the fault cannot be diagnosed prior to transport
  • Have leaked or vented
  • Have sustained physical or mechanical damage

It does not include cells or batteries which are liable to:

  • Rapidly disassemble
  • Undergo a dangerous reaction
  • Produce a flame
  • Evolve a dangerous quantity of heat
  • Evolve toxic, corrosive or flammable gases/vapours

When transported under SP376 the packages must be marked as “Damaged/Defective Lithium Metal Batteries” for (UN3090-UN3091) or “Damaged/Defective Lithium Ion Batteries” for (UN3480-UN3481). In addition they must conform to the related Packaging Instructions, P908 and LP904, and not Packaging Instruction P903, which is used for batteries which are not defective or damaged.

Prior to the adoption of SP376 damaged or defective lithium batteries could only be transported by some of the modes of transport and then were only permitted under additional conditions listed as special provisions or those defined by the competent authority. One reason for SP376 was to allow the transport of damaged or defective lithium batteries to a laboratory for testing to determine the cause of the fault, the need for which was amply demonstrated in the recent events involving aircraft lithium ion batteries malfunctioning.

As the current edition of ADR is based on the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods: Model Regulations (17th Revised Edition) SP376 is not included. In order to allow the application of the special provision a multilateral agreement (M259) has been signed. This is due to expire on 31st

December 2014, with the next edition of ADR, which includes SP376, being applicable from 1st January 2015. The full text of the multilateral agreement can be located on the UNECE website.

Past Blogs

RaineCaroline BW2
Caroline Raine, Principle Consultant

Final Annex VIII to CLP published

23/03/2017
RaineCaroline BW2
Caroline Raine, Principle Consultant

Final Annex VIII to CLP imminent

02/02/2017
WalkerStephen BW2
Stephen Walker, Senior Consultant

ADR 2017 - key changes

01/01/2017
shutterstock25
Pierre Noël, Safety Manager and Chief Elf at North Pole

A Compliance Christmas Carol

19/12/2016
SilverLarissa
Larissa Silver, Emergency Responder Supervisor and Chemical Regulatory Consulant

Tool for poison centres launched by EU Commission

17/11/2016
RaineCaroline
Caroline Raine, Principle Consultant

Lithium batteries - changes to IATA regulations

17/11/2016
RaineCaroline BW
Caroline Raine, Principle Consultant

Update to poison centre regulations

22/09/2016
LangJonathan BW
Jon Lang, Emergency Responder and Chemical Regulatory Consultant

Keeping your SDS updated and compliant

14/09/2016
HaggartyDBW
Dan Haggarty, Head of Emergency Response

What does best practice mean to industry?

22/05/2016
LangJonathan BW
Jon Lang, Emergency Responder and Chemical Regulatory Consultant

SDS Section 1.4 – what numbers are needed?

17/05/2016
WalkerStephen BW
Stephen Walker, Senior Consultant DGSA

Health and Safety Executive (HSE) prosecution

23/02/2016
paddedimage110161 SilverLarissa BW
Larissa Silver, Emergency Responder

European Commission’s new draft amendments review

15/02/2016
StearnMBW
Maria Stearn, Chemdata Manager

The value of proportionate advice

15/02/2016
shutterstock118893988
Pierre Noel, Safety Manager and Chief Elf at North Pole Inc.

NCEC Christmas Guest Blog

16/12/2015
paddedimage110161 SilverLarissa BW
Larissa Silver, Emergency Responder

Selling chemical products into France or Spain?

14/12/2015
DaveyR
Rich Davey, International Business Development Manager

Overcoming regulatory barriers: challenges in Asia

19/11/2015
VuTuan
Tuan Vu, Chemical Emergency Responder

The Tianjin Explosion

16/11/2015
GibbardJ
Jonathan Gibbard, NCEC Practice Director

10 days, 3 countries - NCEC tours South East Asia

25/09/2015
BakerTom
Tom Baker, Senior Emergency Responder

Update for Spanish poison centre

13/07/2015
BakerTom
Tom Baker, Senior Emergency Responder

The importance of emergency telephone response

22/03/2015
SetSize110140 Matthew Hawes National Chemical Emergency Centre
Matthew Hawes

On-scene emergency response

25/11/2014
Matthew Hawes National Chemical Emergency Centre
Matthew Hawes - Emergency Response Specialist

Don’t cry over spilled milk.....

04/09/2014
Matthew Hawes National Chemical Emergency Centre
Matthew Hawes - Emergency Response Specialist

Too small to matter.....

14/04/2014
SetSize110140 GibbardJ
Jon Gibbard

Problems with poison centres

20/12/2013
HaggartyD
Daniel Haggarty

Feature chemical – hydrogen sulfide

13/12/2013
GibbardJ
Jonathan Gibbard

NCEC - Celebrating Its Heritage...

15/11/2013
SetSize110140 HaggartyD
Daniel Haggarty

NCEC in action

25/10/2013
HawesM4
Matthew Hawes

The effect of fertilisers...

16/09/2013
HaggartyD7
Daniel Haggarty

Fee For Intervention (FFI)

06/08/2013
HawesM
Matthew Hawes

Multilateral Agreements and free trade

29/07/2013
HawesM2
Matthew Hawes

GHS and emergency response

12/07/2013
HaggartyD4
Daniel Haggarty

Lithium battery regulations

16/04/2013
HaggartyD3
Daniel Haggarty

Typical emergency calls

19/03/2013
HaggartyD2
Daniel Haggarty

Chemical incidents…then and now

12/02/2013
SetSize110140 HaggartyD
Daniel Haggarty

Has anyone seen MAIAT?

25/10/2012
HaggartyD
Daniel Haggarty

Emergency Responder Candidates

17/09/2012
HaggartyD6
Daniel Haggarty

Implications of OCRS

30/05/2012

Post your comment

Comments for this page have been disabled

Comments

No one has commented on this page yet.

RSS feed for comments on this page | RSS feed for all comments